Coming to Santorini in early spring – the best cost savings hack!

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Coming to Santorini in early spring – the best cost savings hack!

We all know that tourism seasons affect the cost of travel. We all have some concerning questions about off season – about weather, how many places will be open, things like that. Well, today I’m here to tell you – Santorini is not that bad off season! And what is even better, coming here in autumn or early spring is probably the best choice for most of us. Let me tell you why.

The weather is more moderate

Let’s face it – most of us want to experience the opposite of what we’re used to at home when travelling. That’s why we see an influx of people from colder countries during the tourism season every year. Here’s the kicker – many people actually can’t handle the full on blasting Santorini summer midday heat all that well. And it’s understandable – the temperatures often go past +30°C and the Mediterranean sun is known to be pretty harsh. Also locals prefer to be indoors during the major heat. You sweat, you get exhausted and tired faster. Not a good look while walking the streets of Oia in search for adventure.

Coming to Santorini in end of winter/ early spring or autumn actually offer a climate that is still hot, but more manageable – you can be way more active and see and do everything without being all too concerned of dehydration or heat strokes (that actually happens with tourists). The one downside is the risk of having some light rain here and there,but that’s part of the game. And sometimes you even get the +30°C.

When it’s dark, you might want to put on a hoodie or light jacket. That’s it.

The prices are cut, sometimes even in half

As usual for off-season travel, most hotels and other services decrease their prices. Less demand means higher competition, and everyone wants to see you at their place :) Sure, some businesses will close their doors, but you what – having to choose from 7 instead of 10 restaurants for the night does not seem like such a bad deal.

Not to mention that the same happens to santorini flight tickets, which do get pretty expensive during the tourism heat – this is one of the hotspots that the Global Community wants to see, and the demand does leave an impact.

No crowds. You want that!

Santorini is a relatively small island in the Mediterranean Sea. Space is limited, especially in the villages that have been standing here for centuries. We all want to take a walk on the narrow streets, we all want to see the lovely little churches, best views in Santorini, we all want that nice Oia sunset photo to bring back home. The problem is that there’s a lot of us. Honestly, during the tourism season, you might feel that the crowds are a bit too much. Early off season is when the villages kick into a slower gear, and you actually enjoy a slow walk in the streets and have some breathing space.

What you should do in return, is base yourself in or close to the island’s capital Fira. That gives you the best of both worlds and enables you to do more.

If I should answer the question- Santorini, when to travel? I would say – if you want to have a good time and be more active, save some money and not be in crowds all the time, early off season is your best bet! Look into options for coming in end of winter/early spring or autumn!

Here are some quick thoughts on the best times to visit Santorini, based on what you actually plan to do on this little island in the Cyclades, Greece. Read HERE.

Blog Post by Anna Sulte, Santorini photographer Greece

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